Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy

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Oxford University Press #ad - Elizabeth varon's account rescues her from both derision and oblivion, highly principled woman who remained, resourceful, depicting an intelligent, as she saw it, true to her country to the end. Even today, elizabeth van lew remains a controversial figure in her beloved Richmond, remembered as the "Crazy Bet" of Lost Cause propaganda.

But her unionism, republican politics, and outspoken support of racial justice earned her a lifetime of scorn in the former Confederate capital. Varon's powerful biography brings van lew to life, showing how she used the stereotypes of the day to confound Confederate authorities who suspected her, but could not believe a proper Southern lady could be a spy, even as she brought together Union sympathizers at all levels of society, from slaves to slaveholders.

Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy #ad - Varon describes a woman who was very much a product of her time and place, yet continually took controversial stands--from her early efforts to free her family's slaves, to her daring wartime activities and beyond. In southern lady, yankee spy, historian elizabeth Varon provides a gripping, richly researched account of the woman who led what one historian called "the most productive espionage operation of the Civil War.

Under the nose of the confederate government, hampered the Southern war effort, Van Lew ran a spy ring that gathered intelligence, and helped scores of Union soldiers to escape from Richmond prisons. Northern sympathizer in the confederate capital, daring spymaster, postwar politician: Elizabeth Van Lew was one of the most remarkable figures in American history, a woman who defied the conventions of the nineteenth-century South.

Grant named her postmaster of Richmond--a remarkable break with custom for this politically influential post. After the war, a grateful President Ulysses S.

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The Secrets of Mary Bowser: A Novel

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William Morrow Paperbacks #ad - Masterfully written, the Secrets of Mary Bowser shines a new light onto our country’s darkest history. Brunonia barry, bestselling author of the Lace Reader “Packed with drama, intrigue, love, loss, and most of all, the resilience of a remarkable heroine…. What a treat!”—kelly o'connor mcnees, author of the lost summer of louisa may alcottBased on the remarkable true story of a freed African American slave who returned to Virginia at the onset of the Civil War to spy on the Confederates, The Secrets of Mary Bowser is a masterful debut by an exciting new novelist.

The Secrets of Mary Bowser: A Novel #ad - Author lois leveen combines fascinating facts and ingenious speculation to craft a historical novel that will enthrall readers of women’s fiction, historical fiction, and acclaimed works like Cane River and Cold Mountain that offer intimate looks at the twin nightmares of slavery and Civil War. A powerful and unforgettable story of a woman who risked her own freedom to bring freedom to millions of others, The Secrets of Mary Bowser celebrates the courageous achievements of a little known but truly inspirational American heroine.

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The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War

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Mariner Books #ad - At the end of the american Civil War, most of the intelligence records disappeared—remaining hidden for over a century. Fishel discovered long-forgotten documents—the operational files of the Army of the Potomac’s Bureau of Military Information—he had the makings of this, the first book to thoroughly and authentically examine the impact of intelligence on the Civil War, providing a new perspective on this period in history.

A real addition to Civil War history” Kirkus Reviews, starred review. When, at the National Archives, Edwin C. Focusing on intelligence work in the eastern theater, ’ henry harrison, Fishel plays down the role of individual agents like James Longstreet’s famous ‘scout, 1861–1863, concentrating instead on the increasingly sophisticated development of intelligence systems by both sides.

The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War #ad -  .  .  . A treasure trove for historians .  .  . Drawing on these papers as well as over a thousand pages of reports by General McClellan’s intelligence chief, and other information, the detective Allan Pinkerton, he created an account of the Civil War that “breaks much new ground” The New York Times.

As a result, little has been understood about the role of espionage and other intelligence sources, from balloonists to signalmen with their telescopes.

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Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals, Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War

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Cumberland House #ad - Stepping out of line and into battle, treason, these women faced clandestine missions, and death, all because of their passionate commitment to their cause. These are the unknown Civil War stories you need to hear. As stated on the grave marker of union spy Elizabeth Van Lew: "She risked everything that is dear to man—friends, fortune, comfort, health, life itself.

Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals, Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War #ad - ". These are the bold, untold stories of women shaping our very nation. These female spies of the civil War participated in the world's second-oldest profession—spying—a profession perilous in the extreme. The tales of female spies are filled with suspense, bravery, treachery, and trickery. The clever, daring women who helped turn the tides of the Civil WarDuring America's most divisive war, devious, both the Union and Confederacy took advantage of brave and courageous women willing to adventurously support their causes.

They took enormous risks and achieved remarkable results—often in ways men could not do.

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Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War

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Harper #ad - Elizabeth van lew, a wealthy richmond abolitionist, hid behind her proper Southern manners as she orchestrated a far-reaching espionage ring, right under the noses of suspicious rebel detectives. Using a wealth of primary source material and interviews with the spies’ descendants, Abbott seamlessly weaves the adventures of these four heroines throughout the tumultuous years of the war.

The beautiful widow, rose o’neale greenhow, engaged in affairs with powerful Northern politicians to gather intelligence for the Confederacy, and used her young daughter to send information to Southern generals. Karen abbott, the new york times bestselling author of sin in the Second City and “pioneer of sizzle history” USA Today, tells the spellbinding true story of four women who risked everything to become spies during the Civil War.

Karen abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War: the stories of four courageous women—a socialite, an abolitionist, a farmgirl, and a widow—who were spies. After shooting a union soldier in her front hall with a pocket pistol, Belle Boyd became a courier and spy for the Confederate army, using her charms to seduce men on both sides.

Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War #ad - Emma edmonds cut off her hair and assumed the identity of a man to enlist as a Union private, witnessing the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. With a cast of real-life characters including walt whitman, general stonewall Jackson, detective Allan Pinkerton, Temptress, and Emperor Napoleon III, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Soldier, Liar, Spy draws you into the war as these daring women lived it.

Liar, soldier, temptress, Spy contains 39 black & photos and 3 maps.  .

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A Yankee Spy in Richmond: The Civil War Diary of "Crazy Bet" Van Lew Stackpole Classics

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Stackpole Books #ad - Elizabeth van lew, of Crazy Bet, was General Ulysses S. Grant’s spy in the capital city of the Confederacy. She wanted people to think she was insane so that they would be less likely to ask her questions and possibly discover her goal: to defeat the South and to end slavery. Soon her suspicious and condescending neighbors began referring to her as “Crazy Bet.

But she wasn’t mad; she had purpose in her doings. She walked the streets of Richmond dressed in farm woman’s clothing, singing and mumbling to herself.

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Mama Learned Us to Work: Farm Women in the New South Studies in Rural Culture

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Lu ann jones tells quite a different story in Mama Learned Us to Work. Farm women of the twentieth-century South have been portrayed as oppressed, worn out, and isolated. These innovative women showed that poultry production paid off and laid the foundation for the agribusiness poultry industry that emerged after World War II.

Building upon evocative oral histories, she encourages us to understand these women as consumers, producers, and agents of economic and cultural change. As consumers, farm women bargained with peddlers at their backdoors. Jones also examines the relationships between farm women and home demonstration agents and the effect of government-sponsored rural reform.

Mama Learned Us to Work: Farm Women in the New South Studies in Rural Culture #ad - A key business for many farm women was the "butter and egg trade--small-scale dairying and raising chickens. Their earnings provided a crucial margin of economic safety for many families during the 1920s and 1930s and offered women some independence from their men folks. She discusses the professional culture that developed among white agents as they reconciled new and old ideas about women's roles and shows that black agents, mutual aid, despite prejudice, linked their clients to valuable government resources and gave new meanings to traditions of self-help, and racial uplift.

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Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement

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The New Press #ad - Lighting the fires of freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that are vital and relevant today. A vital document for understanding the civil Rights Movement, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.

Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Recommended by the new york times, book riot and autostraddle nominated for a 2019 naacp image award, The Washington Post, a groundbreaking collection of profiles of African American women leaders in the twentieth-century fight for civil rightsDuring the Civil Rights Movement, African American women did not stand on ceremony; they simply did the work that needed to be done.

Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement #ad - Beyond rosa parks and coretta scott King, local, most Americans would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, and national levels. In lighting the fires of freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public.

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Miss Lizzie's War: The Double Life of Southern Belle Spy Elizabeth Van Lew

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Globe Pequot #ad - Grant’s spy in Richmond. As the civil war ground on, an underground Unionist movement flourished in the heart of the Confederacy, led by an unlikely leader. Elizabeth van lew, risked everything to help save the Union, a wealthy and well connected member of Richmond’s elite, skillfully directing this clandestine group and becoming General Ulysses S.

Miss Lizzie's War: The Double Life of Southern Belle Spy Elizabeth Van Lew #ad - Surrounded by a cadre of “slaves” secretly freed and working with her at the risk of their lives--and hers--Lizzie becomes a pivotal character in the narrative that reveals the complexity and horror of war and the possibility of ultimate redemption. Based on an incredible true story, her secret romance with a union prisoner, terrifying flights to freedom engineered by Elizabeth for escaped prisoners and slaves, and ongoing Confederate surveillance, the dangerous work and conspiracies entailed in running a spy network for the Federal Government in the Confederate capital, her scheme to plant a former slave as her spy in the Jefferson Davis home, Lizzie's War revolves around a number of elements: the intrigue involved in Elizabeth’s double life, investigations and arrests of Unionists.

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Trials of the Earth: The True Story of a Pioneer Woman

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - The result is this astonishing first-person account of a pioneer woman who braved grueling work, and a pitiless wilderness she and her family faced floods, fires, tornadoes, bears, panthers, profound tragedy, and snakes to protect her home in the early American South. Near the end of her life, Mary Mann Hamilton 1866 - c.

1936 began recording her experiences in the backwoods of the Mississippi Delta. Eighty-three years later, in partnership with Mary Mann Hamilton's descendants, we're proud to share this irreplaceable piece of American history. Written in spare, rich prose, trials of the Earth is a precious record of one woman's extraordinary endurance and courage that will resonate with readers of history and fiction alike.

Trials of the Earth: The True Story of a Pioneer Woman #ad - The astonishing first-person account of Mississippi pioneer woman struggling to survive, protect her family, and make a home in the early American South. An early draft of trials of the Earth was submitted to a writers' competition sponsored by Little, Brown in 1933. It didn't win, and we almost lost the chance to bring this raw, vivid narrative to readers.

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Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Above all, resist economic and sexual oppression, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South—their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds. Winner of the letitia woods Brown Memorial Book Prize awarded by the Association of Black Women Historians.

Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition #ad - . One of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Anne firor scott, duke universityliving with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society.

This revised edition of ar'n't i a woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives.

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